dynamicafrica:

"Bloom": VLISCO’s Spring 2014 Lookbook.

In their latest Spring 2014 lookbook, Vlisco, the Dutch Wax clothing and textile brand with a strong presence in West and Central Africa, reinterprets florals with their appropriately titled ‘Bloom’ collection.

(via preciousdivineenergy)

kyssthis16:

note-a-bear:

amischiefofmice:

orfs:

averyterrible:

thisplaceisdespair:

flatluigi:

stormingtheivory:

So can we talk about the absolutely stunning duplicity going on here?

holy shit

ok, why the fuck is the graph upside down. that is incredibly misleading

Because its from the Florida Department of Justice, and they have a mandate here.

for those who have trouble inverting it in their head, ftfy:


this is some of the most blatant twisting of info i have ever seen holy shit

woooooow

See…..

kyssthis16:

note-a-bear:

amischiefofmice:

orfs:

averyterrible:

thisplaceisdespair:

flatluigi:

stormingtheivory:

So can we talk about the absolutely stunning duplicity going on here?

holy shit

ok, why the fuck is the graph upside down. that is incredibly misleading

Because its from the Florida Department of Justice, and they have a mandate here.

for those who have trouble inverting it in their head, ftfy:

image

this is some of the most blatant twisting of info i have ever seen holy shit

woooooow

See…..

(via darling-wendy)

pink-vulva:

reasons i want to look GOOD 

  • for myself
  • for myself
  • to plant the seed of envy in other bitch’s hearts
  • for myself

(via boujiebabe)

so many breakdowns about not liking people yay!!!! senior spring!!!!! so much fun times!!!!!! not a shit show of hating everything!!!!

autistpsyche:

you should check out #AcademicAbleism on twitter, if you haven’t already. 

(via blue-author)

My first love
was some insignificant boy
when it should have been
myself.
Michelle K., First Love. (via hushinglove)

(via bayaningbituon)

(Source: samanthapanther, via darling-wendy)

sofriel:

psychosassic:

and all the linguists in the night vale fandom have a collective cheer

I…wow. I did not expect that. I continue to be taken by surprise by the sophistication of Night Vale writers’ grasp of the world. They repeatedly demonstrate the kind of understanding that is frankly shocking from straight white men and makes me think they must have had some really good friends throughout their lives.

sofriel:

psychosassic:

and all the linguists in the night vale fandom have a collective cheer

I…wow. I did not expect that. I continue to be taken by surprise by the sophistication of Night Vale writers’ grasp of the world. They repeatedly demonstrate the kind of understanding that is frankly shocking from straight white men and makes me think they must have had some really good friends throughout their lives.

(Source: bloodstonepentagram, via blue-author)

// how to teach consent to children.//

afrafemme:

  • it has to be sustained. you can’t just check em once & expect they’ll remember. you have to check them very often. teach them why its important. 
  • respect their own space. if your child says “no, i don’t want to kiss. no. i don’t want to hug.” (& definitely don’t do that shit with no warning/permission.) don’t fucking make them. they need to believe they have power of their own environment & body in order to respect that same space in someone else. 
  • protect/defend them when someone violates their consent. “did you like when bobby pushed you?” “no, i didn’t.” “ok, well should we go tell bobby how you feel?”

(via browngirlonwheels)

southern-feminism:

Inclusive children go far.

southern-feminism:

Inclusive children go far.

(via browngirlonwheels)

The Europeans are not yet willing to acknowledge that the world did not wait in darkness for them to bring the light, and that the history of Africa was already old when Europe was born.
John Henrik Clarke, “Education for a New Reality in the African World” (1994)

(Source: z-unit, via strugglingtobeheard)

today i performed a social experiment in my asian american lit class, which is a class of 22: three white men, two moc, six asian women, and eleven white or white-passing women. i counted the number of times the three white men spoke vs the number of times everyone else combined spoke. i only counted comments longer than 20 seconds. i did not count comments by my professor, an asian woman, or the three women who were leading the class in discussion for a grade (except when my professor posed a question and they answered separate from their presentation). the class is 70 minutes long. 

the white men spoke 21 times. combined, the rest of the class spoke 22 times.

coagulates:

Drink water everyday and don’t let boys be mean to you

(via burritosong)

perves:

omgggg

(Source: facebook.com, via delaineyk)

ofanotherfashion:

image

These three Japanese American women are just arriving to Lone Pine, California (May 1942, photographer unknown). They’re walking to a bus that will take them to Manzanar internment camp. There is so much to love about this photograph: the saddle shoes and socks combination, the headscarf, the wide-legged trousers, and, oh yes, the suitcases (including that makeup case!). More striking, still, are the huge smiles.

"For the camera, you smile": Feeling Political

The first time I saw photographs of my family at Camp Pendleton (a refugee camp for Southeast Asians following the Viet Nam War), I was really confused by how happy everyone looked. Though Southeast Asian refugees were definitely not “interned” at these refugee camps, national politics and geopolitical forces compelled them to leave their homes in much the same way Japanese Americans were forced to leave their homes. So why did everyone look so happy? When I was about 10, my mom explained it this way: “Of course we were sad and worried but - for the camera, you smile.”

Many of the Japanese American internees photographed by Ansel Adams and Dorothea Lange must have felt the same way. According to Sue Kunitomi Embrey the chair of the Manzanar Committee, Adams hoped to capture the despair of camp life in order to stir some public sympathy for Japanese Americans but was frustrated by all the primping and posing Japanese Americans did when he was photographing. (Recall that internees were not permitted to bring cameras of their own into the camps).

While I don’t take lightly this decision to include photographs of internment life (or refugee life) in this fashion archive, I’ve decided to include some that depict not only the rich fashion sensibilities of Japanese American women in the 1940s but also a style of strength and resistance often captured in the best fashion photographs. Rather than glossing over the ugly realities of racism that led to this serious infraction of civil rights, I hope that images of smiling and fashion-conscious Japanese American women like the three here adds to and deepens our appreciation of the small acts of feeling, creativity, and resistance that happen everyday in spite of huge limitations.

In an act as seemingly trivial and trite as smiling for the camera, these women interrupt and take some control of the historical, political, and visual frames through which they’re being viewed. And in this way, these kinds of photographs exemplify precisely the goals at the heart of this alternative archive: to present an alternative mode of historical knowledge that is based not simply on an archive of facts (e.g., dates, designers, and design styles) but rather - to adapt a phrase from the queer performance scholar Ann Cvetkovich - one based on an archive of feelings.